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Utah man records himself being a jerk to deputies, makes mistake of quickly reaching into bag

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A Utah man became belligerent when approached by Cache County Sheriff’s Deputies earlier this month and taped is interaction.

Posted by “Travis Heinze” on YouTube, the video shows the Travis refuse to give his personal information to the officers after being stopped for suspicious activity- a crime in the state of Utah.

Travis goes back and forth with the deputy in a childlike manner, eventually reaching quickly into his bag to retrieve ID. The primary deputy calmly draws his sidearm and warns him not to pull a weapon.

After he is checked for warrants, Travis is told he is free to go and waddles off into yet another chapter of “stupid cop block videos.”

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6 COMMENTS

  1. I can’t even listen to this guy. He makes me sick. It’s one thing to protect your rights, and another thing to just be a jerk. Ugh. People like this make me sick.

  2. This article is extremely biased in favor of the Public Servant. Please by all means staff writer show me the exact Utah code which makes a purely subjective term as suspicious a crime in and of itself. Personally, I find your writing style to be suspicious. Based on your statement and the Fact I am viewing this page in Utah you must be committing the crime of suspicion.

    Here’s a few quotes from the Utah Supreme Court.
    “Such unbridled discretion . . . is inherently unreasonable under the Fourth Amendment and article I, section 14.”

    the right not to be “subject to arbitrary invasions solely at the unfettered discretion of officers in the field.” Brown, 443 U.S. at 51 (citing Prouse, 440 U.S. at 654-55).

    We likened this lack of guidance on how to conduct the checkpoint inquiries to the “much hated and feared general warrants issued by the British Crown in colonial days, where British officers were given blanket authority to search wherever they pleased and for whatever might pique their interest.” Id. at ¶ 26. Ultimately, we concluded that “a free society cannot tolerate such a practice.” Id.

    Furthermore: Ok Here’s the situation. A request followed by a question.

    https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/declaration-transcript
    This is an excellent document please read\analyze\comprehend completely. If you are successful with this request, ask yourself if you would be willing to add your signature to the list. Furthermore, ask yourself if we as United States Americans should require 100% of ALL elected officials and public servants to read this thoroughly and also add their signature as well in order to serve us? We hire our servers to be our alleys NOT our adversaries. Personally, I feel their signature addition should be a requisite prior to being sworn in to defend the Constitution. The Constitution in my humble opinion along with ALL subsequent rules\laws can never permit any of the atrocities listed within this document. /Ponder

  3. The cop was the one violating Utah law. Failure to identify is not grounds for detainment. Under 77-7-15, a cop must have reasonable articulable suspicion that a crime has, or is being committed before they can require ID from a person. This was an unlawful detainment by a criminal cop.

  4. Just FYI, this man is a veteran, and spent years in service of his country overseas. Let’s give him some respect, homeless or not.

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