Home News Prosecution’s case against officer Goodson in Freddie Gray trial falls apart

Prosecution’s case against officer Goodson in Freddie Gray trial falls apart

282
2
SHARE
Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, leaves the courthouse in Baltimore during the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, Friday, June 10, 2016, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, leaves the courthouse in Baltimore during the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, Friday, June 10, 2016, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)


The case against Baltimore police officer Caesar Goodson is in shambles following the testimony and cross-examination of a key expert witness for the prosecution.

Former Lt. Commander and Commander of Training with the Baltimore Police Department, Neill Franklin, was supposed to testify that Goodson had given Freddie Gray a ‘rough ride’ which ultimately led to his death and the second-degree murder and manslaughter charges. Goodson was the driver of the transport.

Neill (Stanford) Franklin.  Credit: LinkedIn
Neill (Stanford) Franklin. Credit: LinkedIn

However, when Franklin was cross examined by defense attorney Matthew Fraling, it became clear that there wasn’t a shred of evidence that a ‘rough ride’ ever took place.

According to Baltimore Sun reporter Kevin Rector, the cross examination went like this:

Fraling: In a review of CCTV footage, did you see any unexpected acceleration?
Franklin: No.
Fraling: Deceleration?
Franklin: No.
Fraling: (Sharp) turns?
Franklin: No.
Fraling: In your expert opinion, did Goodson give Gray a rough ride?
Franklin: I can’t say for sure.
Fraling: What’s the basis of your rough ride knowledge?
Franklin: Growing up in Baltimore, stories.
Fraling: Studied? Written about?
Franklin: No. No.
Fraling: Should the judge take you as a rough ride “expert” based on anecdotal stories?
Franklin: Plus knowledge from arrests.

To this, Franklin told a story about a DUI arrest he made while he was a Maryland State Trooper in Baltimore and how he thought Baltimore PD gave the guy a ‘rough ride.’

Fraling: What was the outcome of that investigation?
Franklin: Wasn’t one.
Fraling: You didn’t report it?
Franklin: Man wasn’t injured.

This was followed by an exchange between the judge and franklin about whether or not he was possibly complicit in an alleged ‘rough ride’ and how seatbelting doesn’t ensure an individual will be secure during transport.

Then, if things couldn’t get worse for Mosby’s prosecution, Franklin was asked a simple question.

Fraling: What’s a 10-15?
Franklin: I don’t know.
Fraling: (With one eyebrow raised) Aren’t you testifying as an expert on general orders, policies and procedures?

A 10-15 in this jurisdiction is the code to request for a transport.

Following Franklin’s testimony, the prosecution rested its case against officer Goodson and the defense immediately filed a formal motion for acquittal. According to Rector, this is typically verbally requested at this stage in a trial, but the defense filed a written motion.

This morning, the judge denied the request for immediate acquittal following arguments from both sides.

Officer Caesar Goodson arrives at the courthouse Monday, June 13, 2016, for the third day of his trial in the Freddie Gray case, in Baltimore. Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray. (Barbara Haddock Taylor/The Baltimore Sun via AP)
Officer Caesar Goodson arrives at the courthouse Monday, June 13, 2016, for the third day of his trial in the Freddie Gray case, in Baltimore. Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray. (Barbara Haddock Taylor/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

© 2016 Bright Mountain Media, Inc.

All rights reserved. The content of this webpage may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written consent of Bright Mountain Media, Inc. which may be contacted at info@brightmountainmedia.com, ticker BMTM.

If you have any problems viewing this article, please report it here.

2 COMMENTS

  1. The State’s key witness on Rough Rides was not even knowledgeable about 10 codes. Seems Mosby charged on NO REAL SUPPORTED evidence at all. A dog and pony show to appease the drug thugs and other low lives that reside in Baltimore City. Lets appease the mob, Get my husband elected Mayor, and let hundreds of thugs go free who rioted and burned a whole community.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here