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Former Md. judge gets one year probation for ordering court officer to electro-shock defendant

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This framegrab from video, provided by the Charles County, Md. Circuit Court, taken July 23, 2014, shown in court Thursday, March 31, 2016, shows Saamir Jhaled Khaleel Kingali on the floor after Judge Robrt C. Nalley ordered a deputy to activate a "stun-cuff" on Kingali. The former Maryland judge was sentenced Thursday, March 31, 2016, to participate in anger-management classes and pay a $5,000 fine. (Charles County, Md. Circuit Court via AP)
This framegrab from video, provided by the Charles County, Md. Circuit Court, taken July 23, 2014, shown in court Thursday, March 31, 2016, shows Saamir Jhaled Khaleel Kingali on the floor after Judge Robrt C. Nalley ordered a deputy to activate a “stun-cuff” on Kingali. The former Maryland judge was sentenced Thursday, March 31, 2016, to participate in anger-management classes and pay a $5,000 fine. (Charles County, Md. Circuit Court via AP)


A former Maryland judge, who pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of violating a defendant’s civil rights, was sentenced this week to a year’s probation.

Former Charles County Circuit Court Judge Robert Nalley ordered an officer in his court to electro-shock a defendant who was representing himself on a gun charge in 2014.

It was during jury selection that Delvon King was citing previous court procedure, when Nalley, seemingly annoyed with him, interrupted and said: “Stop. Stop.” Then he says: “Mr. Sheriff, do it. Use it.”

A stun-cuff was attached to King’s right leg at the time. Members of the ACLU say it’s only supposed to be used in cases where there’s a “present danger” to the court — not just because the judge is annoyed with the defendant.

King dropped to the ground when a 50,000-volt shock was administered through the ankle strap, according to the Washington Post.

He’s heard on a videotape screaming three times. While he was not seriously injured, King says he was “disoriented” afterwards and could not focus on the case. The self-described “sovereign citizen” said Nalley “tortured” him and deprived him of a fair trial.

During Thursday’s sentencing, a magistrate judge imposed a $5,000 fine and ordered Nalley to complete an anger-management program, the Post reported. King, not satisfied with the sentence, was sitting in the gallery at the time it was handed down. Nalley did say he made an “error in judgment” but never referenced King nor did he apologize to him directly.

Nalley retired from the bench in September 2013, but was still called upon to preside over cases on a part-time basis. A year later, after the King incident went public, the Maryland Court of Appeals banned him from the bench.

 

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